5 Tips to help kids love work

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There’s no way mom can do everything around the house – nor should she!  Get the kids involved with these easy tips and tools.

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There comes a time in every mother’s life when she realizes that she is basically just a maid.  Eventually all the little people just start assuming mom’s gonna do everything (because she always has) and mom slowly goes insane from all laundry-dishes-toilet-scrubbing.

The trick, of course, is to get the kids to actually HELP around the house, but as any mother who’s ever passed her 6 year old a dust cloth can attest, this is easier said than done.  Read on for some tried and true tips for getting small children to not only pitch in, but LOVE doing it!

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  1.  Give them kid-friendly tools for the job.  None of my little kids can handle the vacuum by themself yet, so we pulled out these  Scotch-Brite™ 50% Stickier Lint Rollers to help pick up crumbs and junk around the house.  They handled the inside of the couch cushions and the living room rug like a breeze!  And I’m telling you, my kids were FIGHTING over using them; they thought it was the most fun ever.The rollers picked up small dirt and crumbs easily, but also grabbed bigger debris, like pumpkin seeds that my kids had dumped inside the couch.  They were even sticky enough to grab glitter on the rug from a broken Christmas ornament.  Yep, you read that right…they clean up GLITTER.  The nemesis of mothers everywhere.target-lint-rollers
    (I got mine at Target in the aisle with all the cleaning supplies)
  2. Add music and/or a reward at the end.  My kids clean up the playroom in record time when T. Swift is blasting, and they work extra hard and fast when there’s a treat or some electronics time waiting for them when they’re done.
  3. Allow them independence.  There wasn’t much instruction needed to show the kids how to use the Scotch-Brite 50% Stickier Lint Rollers, so I just handed them over and got out of their way.  If you struggle with control freakish tendencies like I do, you can be tempted to micromanage every little job, but nothing kills kids’ enthusiasm like a mom who keeps correcting them!make-jobs-for-kids

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4.  Praise the steps along the way.  My little ones mostly just want to make me happy; if I can give them positive reinforcement as they’re learning a chore, they’ll remember that chore as a fun experience.  That means they’ll be more likely to do it in the future – score!

5.  Turn it into a game.  Next time I’m going to tell each kid that it’s a race to see who can get their Scotch-Brite 50% Stickier Lint Roller to lose its stickiness the quickest.  The quicker they fill up their roller with crumbs and junk, the quicker my (er, our) job is done!  We also loved using them on our upholstered bar stools, cause those things are always covered in crud.  Then I’ll put someone on the couch downstairs, and on the Christmas tree skirt, and on the carpeted stairs…

Teaching kids to work (and enjoy it) is not always an easy thing, but I find that my younger kids always want to be involved in what mom is doing.  If we can help them learn basic skills and then get out of their way, they just might surprise us in what they can do!

Check out more inspiration for your Scotch-Brite 50% Stickier Lint Roller HERE.  And get a Target Cartwheel Offer for 15% Off Scotch-Brite 50% Stickier Lint Roller (11/27-12/3) HERE!

When you just wanna quit

Have you ever just wanted to throw in the towel on motherhood?  There’s nothing wrong with you, I promise!

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(Quick and dirty vlog version of this post at the end!)

I wanted to quit being a mom today.  I know that sounds drastic and melodramatic, but heaven help me –  I.  Was.  Done.
Done with the tantrums, the fights, the nagging, the complaining, the sassiness; it just all came to a head in a filthy house with an overtired mom who wanted to storm out and never look back.

I really hope other moms don’t have days like this regularly, but my suspicion is that we all do.  The benefits of being a mom can sometimes be so great that it makes me want to cry great big joyous, grateful tears.

There are brief moments here and there where I look at my kids and I just wanna squeeze them all in a death grip of love and happiness!  But the majority of days (lately) have been so hard that I’m a lot closer to bursting into the other kind of tears.

The hardest part about motherhood is that we’re supposed be so darn grateful for it all the time.  I know there are accountants and lawyers and firemen and secretaries who walk around hating their jobs…but if you ever say (or even think) that being a mom just might kinda suck, then you must be an evil, terrible person. (BAD! Bad, naughty you!!)

If I feel frustrated about all my kids driving me insane, then guilt sets in because so many sweet women would do anything to have just one baby.  Maybe those of you with 1 or 2 kids feel like you can’t complain because you don’t have a huge family.  We stay-at-home moms might feel bad for wishing we had more time when those of you who work feel like no one will ever understand how busy your days are.

The fact is, motherhood is freaking hard no matter what it looks like.  You and your feelings of frustration, stress and being overwhelmed are always valid.  We always have a right to our feelings, no matter how unpleasant they may be.

Not only is it OK to feel these things, it’s OK to tell someone.  We should all have a non-judgmental friend or family member who we confide in when we’re at our wits’ end.

Lest anyone be duped into thinking my mothering attempts are all sunshine and roses, let the entirety of the internet hereby know now and forevermore: most days I have no idea what the crap I’m doing.

Our real work as mothers is pretty scary stuff.  It lies in loving, teaching and molding our children to be the best people they can be.  Even in the best circumstances, that’s a terrifying job.  Add in a household to run, a marriage to work on, maybe another job to perform, not to mention special needs, educating our kids, community obligations…it all just seems completely impossible to juggle all those balls.   It’s a wonder any of us want to become moms in the first place! (I suspect newborn squishiness is to blame.)

I try to remember in these moments of self-doubt, that my kids are part of my family for a reason.  I believe that every mom has something (actually oodles of things!) she can give her children that no one else can.  I also feel really strongly that every child can teach his parents lessons that we’d otherwise never be able to learn on our own.

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Sometimes I’m positive that even my very, very best will never be enough.  That my “good” mothering is sub-par to everyone else’s in the whole entire world, and that I will fail my children and they will never reach the potential they could (and/or they will potentially become creepy criminal weirdos who lurk in bushes and spy on people.  Ew.).  But, you know what I’ve realized lately?  Our mothering effort is completely independent of our children’s performance.

Let me just say that again…Our EFFORT as mothers is completely independent of how our children PERFORM.

Your toddler screaming and throwing toys through the aisles of Target does not make you a bad mom.   Your preteen saying he hates you and slamming a door in your face doesn’t make you a bad mom.
Your teenager getting into drugs or porn or hanging out with terrible friends does NOT make you a bad mom!
And even if, heaven forbid, our sweet innocent babies grow up to be serial killers or evil dictators or any number of awful things, all of the sacrifices we made as mothers would still be valid.  They would still COUNT.  You would still be a good person, even if your child chose not to be.

That’s a really, really hard thing to think about.  That no matter how hard we work as moms, we cannot choose our children’s destinies and we can’t keep them from harm or evil.  All we can do is love them.

And so, we do.  We love them with everything we’ve got. And we try to remember, amidst all the poop and the pb&j’s and the puberty, that we ARE good mothers.  Because good mothers show their love through service.  We might never throw a Pinterest-worthy party, or do our hair in time for preschool drop-off or be able to respond calmly when a kid says mean things, but we will keep loving.

Because loving is what moms do best.

The Pros and Cons of a Big Family

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Not a lot of people know exactly what their future family will look like when they’re still single…or even within the first few years of marriage.  But Luke and I always knew we wanted a large family and we’re pretty tickled pink that we’ve been able to make this dream happen!  Of course, having almost 8 children isn’t your typical success dream, like owning your own home or traveling the world.  It’s not filled with beautifully decorated rooms or fancy European food…and the hours are atrocious.  But it really IS wonderful!

Here’s just a peek into the good, the bad and the ridiculous of parenting a sports-team-sized crew!

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Click read more…

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Family Pictures: Dressing the Clan

Fall is the quintessential time for family photo shoots: temperatures have cooled off, you’re gearing up for the holidays and prepping to send out greeting cards.  But along with family photos comes the stress of all the prepwork!  There’s the photographer to choose, location to determine and, worst of all, the outfits to coordinate.  Ay!

I’ve got some tips today for how to dress your crew for the perfect family photo shoot…whether you have 1 child or 10!

 

family-picture-collageFind your color inspiration.  Sometimes this comes in the form of an outfit you already own and want to use, sometimes it’s a dress you see in the store or some other random print!  This year I used the ottoman in my daughter’s room as inspiration and decided to go with gray, berry and blue tones.  

While sometimes a wide array of colors can work for a large group, you’ll generally want to stick with no more than 3 colors (or color families).  Also, be sure to choose colors that are in style for the season!  You might want hot pink and royal blue for your Christmas cards but if those colors aren’t in stores, you’re going to have a hard time finding outfits for everyone.  This fall you’ll find lots of gray and blue tones, maroon and berry colors, blush pink and dusty greens.

Dress the hardest body first, and build around that.  Since I’m pregnant this year, I had considerably fewer options that I felt comfortable in, so my outfit got chosen first.  This could also be a child who has fewer clothes than the others or one whose outfit you already know you love and want to use.

Neutrals, neutrals, neutrals!  Beware of too many prints and colors; neutrals help ground an ensemble and will balance out all the other busyness.  It’s tempting to dress everyone in a cute print or color but in order for everyone to work together, there has to be places for the eye to rest.

Once you’ve gathered all the outfits you own that you want to use, pack them up and go shopping!  You can also take a picture of the outfits to reference while in the store, but having the actual clothes with you makes it MUCH easier to mix and match.  My favorite places to shop for the whole family are Old Navy and Gap since they have clothes for every age and use the same color scheme throughout the store each season.  This makes it a cinch to coordinate for the whole family!  It also helps to have an idea in mind of what you’re looking for…a printed dress with berry tones or a neutral button down, etc.

Be sure all the outfits work well in any combination…in other words, make sure the girls look good together, the boys’ outfits work next to each other, mom and dad’s colors blend, etc.  You want to make sure that no matter the configuration your photographer is shooting, all the colors meld well.  

In the example above, I put mom and dad in neutrals, with a colored cardigan and shoes for mom.  Then assuming there are 2 boys and 2 girls, I put one of each gender in a neutral and one in a colorful outfit, with just 2 simple prints.  No matter who gets photographed together, it will look great!

If you need more tips for how to survive family pictures, be sure to check out this post as well.

And to watch me walk through the process of selecting our outfits for this year’s pics, watch this FB Live video!

You’re Not a Good Mom…You’re a GREAT One

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I’ve got a deep(ish) motherhood post for you today, because so much mom-stuff has been on my mind lately.  These posts can get really wordy though, and so I’m excited to be working on some brand spanking new videos for the blog!  I can’t wait to share more mom-musings and DIY tutorials via video because they’re just so much fun! (But also so, SO much work…yikes!).  Here’s hoping they’ll be ready soon!

Before our France trip last month, I’d found myself turning into a pretty mean mom: there was lots of yelling, impatience, frustration and I was really slow to appreciate my kids.  We all get this way sometimes, and for me as a full-time SAHM (especially one who doesn’t send her kids to school…believe me, there are days I WISH I did – haha!) it can be really difficult to pull myself out of that funk.  Summers are especially hard on us here in Phoenix cause it’s so darn HOT and everyone’s cranky and miserable and stuck inside with too much screen time; i. e. recipe for disaster.

Then Luke and I took a 10 day trip away from everyone and I came back with a fresh perspective.  Life didn’t get any easier (coming back to real life is always an adjustment, especially after a selfish vacay where you only take care of yourself!), but I noticed that my mindset had shifted, just the tiniest bit.

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The Gift of a Body

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Hey all!  I’ve had some deep thoughts swirling the last few days that I really want to share with you all.  I’ve been ruminating on our miraculous bodies and how we act, think and speak about them.

If you’re a woman, then chances are REALLY good you’ve experienced some body angst.  Our world is just too obsessed with physical perfection for any of us to grow up in it without feeling a little (or a LOT of) insecurity surrounding our looks.  Deep down we all know that it isn’t right to feel this way, but most of us aren’t really sure how to overcome it.  I’ve been blessed with a few years of experience and gotten a fair amount of use out of my body (bearing 7 kids is a fair amount, right??) that I feel blessed to have overcome some struggles in this regard.  I want to share with you a few steps I think we can all embrace when it comes to how we view our bodies.

The first thing I want to really emphasize is this: you are NOT your body.  I believe that everyone has a physical body that houses a spiritual soul and that our bodies are only a portion of who we are.  In fact, it’s a portion that we have little control over.  We can’t choose how tall we are, or our hair or eye color (even though we may try!) or the basic shape of our bodies.  We can’t choose whether or not we tan or get freckles, or whether or not we need glasses or braces.  And yet, all too often, the world judges us as if these physical features DEFINE us.  They most certainly do not!  It can be hard to let go of past trauma regarding our bodies; abuse, taunting, snide comments or insecurities can be deep seated and very damaging.  But it’s important to remember that these things are not who we are.  We are more than our bodies!!

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Secondly, we can influence the world’s obsession with bodies for good.  I am sad and ashamed to admit that a person’t body shape used to be the very first thing I noticed about someone.  I didn’t mean to do this, and I have worked hard to stop this habit, but it was an automatic reaction I acquired after years of being obsessed with my own outward appearance.  I think our greatest influence in this area begins with our daughters and sons.  Did you know that what you say about your OWN body can influence your children just as much as what you say about THEIRS?  None of us would even consider insulting our daughters’ bodies and yet we often think nothing of ridiculing our own bodies in front of our kids.  If we want them to respect their own bodies and those of others, we have to model respect for our own.  Luke and I have talked a lot about this and have decided on some basic rules for our house: we obviously don’t call anyone “fat” but we also avoid the word “skinny”, and instead we focus on words like “strong” and “healthy”.  We want our kids to focus on how they feel, instead of how they look.

On that note, I’ll share with you that I’ve made a personal decision that I won’t alter my body surgically.  This is obviously not a very popular decision in some circles and I have lots of friends and family that have made other decisions in this regard…this is in no way meant to shame or judge anyone for their decisions!  But, I personally would only choose this route for purely selfish reasons, and so I’ve decided that it’s not the path for me.  I love the idea of embracing every stage of life, no matter what it looks like (and trust me, my abs don’t look like much anymore!) and not fighting the inevitable aging and sagging process.  It’s just a losing game, after all.  Again, I am not aiming to make anyone else feel badly about choosing plastic surgery and I completely understand reconstructive surgeries…I just don’t plan on any myself.

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The next step is to truly, TRULY appreciate our bodies.  This is so hard, I get it!  You just want to lose 15 pounds or really tone up your rear end.  Or stop having people ask you if you’re pregnant when your baby is 4!!  But here’s the thing…our bodies will never measure up to the world’s standard of perfection; it’s ever-changing and it’s just too impossible to reach.  But our bodies are so incredible! It is truly a divine miracle that two miniscule cells can combine to create the jaw-dropping complexity of the human body.  When something does go wrong with our bodies, we often marvel at how many minutes, days, and decades our bodies function normally without our even giving it a second thought.  Now, I am speaking as someone who has not had to endure any serious bodily trials  (except for one not-so-fun altercation with an open flame in my youth…yikes!); my body is whole and for that I am forever grateful.  But perhaps those with serious scars, lost limbs, death-defying illnesses and other broken bodies can attest even more intently how wonderful it is to have a body that can do what we need it to do.

A little disclaimer at this point: I obviously take time on my appearance; I wear makeup, sometimes color my hair and really enjoy dressing fashionably.  Some might argue that this is vain and that I shouldn’t need these things if I truly appreciate my body as is.  And they may have a point!  But doing these things actually does help me appreciate my body, and I really try hard to strike a balance between working on the exterior and on the interior.  On this note, showing gratitude for our bodies begins with treating it right.  If we don’t love how we feel, we can make changes!  We can eat better, we can exercise, we can get more sleep.  These things will help us to maximize our bodies’ potential and realize all the good they can do for us.  We have so many resources available to us in the form of good foods, holistic remedies and medications; we should all fight for good health!

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Lastly, if you still struggle with hard feelings towards your body, find something that it can do for you!  Make a goal to run a race, participate in a competition, or just go outside and jump on the trampoline with your kids.  While for me, pregnancy and birth have been the turning points in how I view and appreciate my body, many women are terrified of motherhood simply because of what it means for their appearance.  I can think of nothing more tragic than a woman missing out on being a mom, only because she fell prey to the world’s definition of beauty.  Flabby skin, stretch marks and extra pounds are nothing in comparison with the ability to conceive, carry, deliver and breastfeed a perfect tiny human; and while not everyone gets the chance to have these experiences, they have forever changed how I perceive my body!

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The VBAC: Making An Informed Decision

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Hey all!  I’m excited to be back with another post in my series on birth!  I’ve previously written about epidurals and c-sections and today, we’re talking about VBACS.

The term “VBAC” stands for “Vaginal Birth After Cesarean” and as the rate of c-sections continues to climb in many countries, so does talk of VBACS.  Moms everywhere are asking things like, “Is a VBAC safe?”  “Is it necessary or desirable?”  “Am I eligible to have a vaginal birth after a c-section?” and “What are the risks?”

I hope this post can answer some of those questions and inspire anyone with a history of a cesarean to become more informed and ready to face future births!

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As discussed in my C-section post, we know that cesareans are an unnatural birth outcome and present risks to both baby and mother.  That being said, just because you’ve had a c-section before (or even multiple!) does NOT mean you necessarily have to have a repeat surgery in the future.  I remember grieving after Liam’s birth because I knew I wanted a large family, yet I couldn’t envision putting my body through 4 or more cesareans.  Luckily, I found some great resources regarding VBACS and have been able to find supportive providers who allowed me to try for the births I had hoped for.  I’ve since delivered 6 babies vaginally after that initial cesarean with no complications.

If it is a safe option for you, there’s a good chance you can have one!

While my cesarean was unexpected, emergent and traumatic, I understand that not all c-sections end up that way.  Some are planned, peaceful and wonderful experiences.  If you were lucky enough to have one of these, you might be wondering why anyone would choose a vaginal birth over a planned cesarean.  Barring any life-threatening need for a cesarean , vaginal births are desirable for a number of reasons:

  1.  No surgical risks such as blood loss, side effects from anesthesia, adhesions (cases where the scar tissue attaches itself to other organs), blood clots, extended recovery time, etc.
  2. Less traumatic on mother and baby: c-section babies often have fluid in their lungs, trouble breathing and other complications.
  3. If labor is allowed to begin naturally at the end of pregnancy, there’s no risk of accidentally delivering a pre-term baby.  The bodies of both mother and baby work in tandem to signal when baby is ready to be born; it’s not usually wise to forcefully extract a baby before labor begins.
  4. Lower medical costs and shorter hospital stay!IMG_4069

On the flip-side, some of you with previously negative c-section experiences might be wondering why anyone would WANT to undergo another surgery.  Your doctor might choose to surgically deliver your baby if your first cesarean was due to (or your current pregnancy includes):

  1. Eclampsia
  2. Serious medical problems with mother or baby
  3. Poorly positioned placenta or unusual bleeding
  4. Any other life-threatening emergency

As discussed in the c-section post, some less clear-cut reasons for an additional surgery include a baby estimated to be larger than usual, a breech baby or a mother with a small pelvis.  These DO NOT always necessitate an automatic cesarean.  Do some research, get a second (or third!) opinion, pray/meditate, and follow your gut to make the best decision for you and your baby.

There can be risks associate with a VBAC as well.  The most dangerous (and one you’ll probably hear about most often) is the risk of uterine rupture.  The strain on a uterine scar during labor can sometimes cause it to reopen, and this usually has very serious results for mom and/or baby.  Luckily however, uterine rupture is very rare and occurs in right around .5% of laboring women who have had a previous cesearean (check out this great article for more details).

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There are TONS of amazing resources online regarding VBACS and how to decide whether one is right for you.  The VBAC Education Project is a great place to start.  The International Cesearean Awareness Network (ICAN) is another great place to learn more.  It’s difficult to even scratch the surface of all the great information these websites hold – be sure to check them out!

Lastly, I wanted to touch on the subject of homebirths and VBACS.  While there are still restrictions in many states regarding the ability to give birth at home after a cesarean, other states have now lifted bans and allow certified, licensed midwives to assist women attempting a VBAC in their home.  Three of my births occurred at home (all 3 technically considered VBACS) and I’m so grateful for these experiences!  I researched and prayed and listened and we decided that this choice would be the safest and the most peaceful for me and each of these babies.

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I believe that each woman is the most qualified to make these crucial decisions regarding the birth of her baby.  Regardless of what your birthing choices look like, it’s important to remember that you HAVE choices!  It can be both scary and empowering to face such important decisions, but they are the first of many you’ll need to make for your baby throughout his or her life.

You can do it!!

If you have any other questions about VBACS or want to hear more about my experiences, feel free to email me!  (whiskem {at} gmail {dot} com) I love talking birth and encouraging women to make informed decisions.

 

**Note: As I am not a medical professional, nothing in this post should be considered medical advice.  Please consult a qualified OB or midwife for more information about VBACS and to decide if it is the right option for you.

A Child in Pain

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I want to tell you a story about our oldest child, Liam and an incredibly hard trial he had to go through.

Last year he began experiencing some terrible stomach pain (coupled with vomiting) for several months and even though now things are much, MUCH better, it took me a long time to gain some wisdom from that experience.  It was really painful to watch as his mom, but we’ve learned a lot from it and I’m finally ready to share it so that hopefully we might be able to help someone else!

Liam’s gastrointestinal troubles actually began years and years ago…probably as an infant.  He was the most colicky baby of all of our children, and it wasn’t just because he was our first and we didn’t know better!  Everyone mentioned how fussy he was and that it took a quasi-miracle to calm him down.

Fast forward several years and Liam began complaining of occasional stomach upset and sometimes vomiting for no apparent reason.  He’d just go into the bathroom, throw up and then come out and announce, “I just threw up, Mom!”  We attributed it to simply a sensitive stomach at the time and even though we brought it up to the pediatrician a couple times,  no doctor ever had any helpful suggestions and it wasn’t bad enough (yet) to warrant additional research.

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Then last year, right after Marilyn was born (about May 2015), Liam began experiencing INTENSE, daily abdominal pain.  It seemed to almost come out of nowhere and it was so bad, some days all he could do was roll up in a ball and lie on the couch.  It was heartbreaking for us as his parents to see him this way and nothing we did seemed to help.  We took him off dairy for a while, then gluten, then some other random stuff.  Then we started wondering if maybe it was stress, or constipation or anxiety over having a new baby in the house.

The climax came after a month or two when he was in so much pain one night he was literally screaming and begging us to help him.  It scared the living daylights out of me, so we took him to the nearest pediatric ER.  They poked and prodded and did scans; then declared him constipated and sent us home.  My momma heart just KNEW this couldn’t be it!

So then we began taking him to doctors.  First our regular pediatrician, then a gastroenterologist, then another GI, then a naturopath, then a psychologist…you get the idea.  And they ran test after test: bloodwork, urinalysis, MRI, tests for Celiac and Crohn’s, colonoscopy and endoscopy all without conclusive results: everything looked normal.  It was an exhausting, frustrating and expensive several months.

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All while this was going on, something in the back of my head kept hinting to me that his diet needed to change.  I’ve always worked hard to feed my kids fairly healthy whole foods, but Liam has always been my pickiest eater.  If it was his choice, he’d survive on cheese crisps and pizza for the rest of his life.  What surprised me most about the doctors that we went to up to this point, was that not a single one of them (barring the naturopath) questioned his diet or suggested he change it.  I thought it quite strange that when they saw an otherwise asymptomatic, healthy kid with stomach pain, they didn’t start wondering if maybe it was something he was eating.

The last straw came when we visited yet another GI, at a pediatric hospital who came very highly recommended to us.  At the end of this visit, the doctor suggested that we start pain management therapy and techniques.  In other words, he was essentially saying, “We have no idea what’s going on and can’t help your son.  He will suffer with this indefinitely and we can only put him on pain meds and hope he learns to cope.”  I left that office almost in tears…how was I supposed to explain to my 10-year-old that he would have to deal with this pain, without a solution, for…EVER??

I refused to believe it.  I had already promised him that we would find a solution no matter what, and I planned on keeping that promise, goshdangit!  It was at this point that we saw the naturopath who, even though they couldn’t offer much in the way of answers, did start him on some holistic supplements that actually helped.  If Liam took them regularly, the pain could mostly be held at bay.  I also then emailed a friend of mine who I knew to be very passionate and knowledgeable about nutrition (including gut-healing diets) and whose husband was also an MD.  She explained some things she thought might be going on with Liam and then recommended we see her husband.

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It turned out that not only is her husband a traditional family practitioner, he also specializes in integrative medicine (or a more holistic medical approach).   He listened to our whole story, looked up and learned about the supplements that had been helping Liam and then FINALLY gave us some real answers!  I won’t bore you with all the details  but in short, he said Liam’s GI tract was damaged and needed some healing.  He also suggested we start the FODMAP diet and recommended a few other things to change as well.

You guys – once we really committed to this diet (because it took a few tries and some tears before Liam was committed to eliminating ice cream and wheat!) the pain DISAPPEARED.  Seriously, it was a true miracle.  It really wasn’t until about March of this year (NINE months after the beginning of his pain!) that he turned to me and said, “Mom- my stomach doesn’t hurt anymore!”   We were so happy!  After almost a year of tears, prayers, blessings and pleading to take this pain away, it was finally gone.

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I learned a couple of valuable lessons during this time period:

  1.  When my loved ones are suffering, and there’s nothing I can do, I’m often tempted to get angry.  It upsets me and it upsets my children to see me this way.  During this last year, I learned a lot about Christ’s perfect love and His commandment to “comfort those that stand in need of comfort.”
  2. A mother’s job is HARD and suffering alongside your child is the hardest part of all.  If your child is in pain, he needs you at the top of your game.  Take care of yourself and find an empathetic friend to talk to.
  3. The solution to most health problems is DIET.  If our bodies are in pain or not functioning properly, we owe it to ourselves to research and discover which foods will heal us.  Our food supply has a lot of problems with it today, so going back to basic, unprocessed whole foods is always a great place to start.
  4. A mother’s intuition is rarely wrong.  I think it’s a special connection we moms have with God’s spirit, telling us how to best care for our children.  If we have a problem and need a solution, sometimes we just need the courage to listen to that little voice inside.  I believe it will always lead us to where we should go!Good luck raising those amazing little humans, mamas!

Easter & Pattern Updates!

easter-fam-2016

I apologize ahead of time for the ridiculous onslaught of pictures in this post.  Prepare to be bombarded.

Here are all our Easter pics plus more shots of and details about the updated Infinite A-line Dress Pattern!  Check them out!  (Click Read More)

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When Mom’s Afraid

Vivian-hospital-sleeping2If you follow me on Instagram, then you already know that our sweet 4-year-old Vivian was in the hospital recently for a febrile seizure.  While she’s home now and doing great, I’ve been surprised how few moms have heard of, or know how to react to these seizures.  I hope putting our story out there might help another mom or dad know what to do if it ever happens to their child (excuse all the grainy phone pictures!).

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